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Troy vs Magpul Bad Lever – Key Differences You Need to Watch Out For

Magpul Bad Lever vs Troy

The AR platforms introduced ambidextrous controls to compete with modern semi-automatic pistols. These impressive features piqued our team’s interest, so we decided to equip one of our rifles with something between the Magpul Bad Lever vs Troy ABR. As most gun enthusiasts, we are also after consistency. Should we just toss the coin then? You’ll find out.

Both models mount via a clamshell covering the release lever. But unlike the BAD, where the back comes off from just the set screw, the Troy has a sliding metal back piece with a set screw at the back, so you need to remove your upper before setting up. The Troy’s extension drops down a little lower than the BAD and makes a 90-degree turn to bring its control pad to the right-hand side of the receiver.

While the Magpul BAD Lever is designed to fit most AR15, Troy will not work with all AR15’s. Troy appears to have a complimentary area for the bolt catch and release on the left side, while the Magpul seems only to have a larger space for the bolt release. The Troy unit was a little heavier-made than the Magpul unit and utilized a flat-head screw and a small Allen screw to lock it into place.

Specification Chart

Magpul Bad Lever

  • Model: Magpul Bad Lever
  • Face Length (Thickest): .556”
  • Face Width (Smallest): .778″
  • Depth from Arm to Receiver: .326”
  • Width at Smallest: .224″
  • Width at Thickest: .224”
  • Arm Length: 1.453″
  • Weight: 0.25 oz

Troy

  • Model: Troy
  • Face Length (Thickest): .850”
  • Face Width (Smallest): .555”
  • Depth from Arm to Receiver: .408”
  • Width at Smallest: .291”
  • Width at Thickest: .299”
  • Arm Length: 1.286″
  • Weight: 0.3 oz

In-Depth Comparison

Troy & Magpul BAD Lever Pricing

Since Magpul Bad Lever vs Troy offers almost the same price and the same features, it’s practically impossible not to just toss the coin in choosing between them. Well, maybe a dollar could make a difference, so the point still goes to Troy for being a dollar cheaper than the Magpul Bad Lever.

Looking for affordable grip accessories? Check out our review on the best AR grips for precision shooting.

Designs

On the outside, Troy appears to be stronger than the skinny Magpul’s arm. But we didn’t like the large squared away bolt release face as it adds a large piece of metal and doesn’t flow well with the rifle, unlike that of the BAD, which almost flows with the curves of the gun.

The ABR is much more square and robust in terms of design, whereas the BAD is sleek and flowing. With this, BAD won another point.

troy bold release design

Magpul BAD & Troy Bolt Release Operation

Being a longtime gun owner, we feel that Troy stomps over the Magpul BAD in this particular category. When releasing the bolt in Troy, the strong hand lever operation allowed the support hand to naturally return to the foregrip after feeding a magazine, which impressed us. Engaging the bolt catch without removing the strong hand from a fire-ready position was a desirable quality with this upgrade.

Weight

As the chart reflects, Troy ABR is larger in almost every measurement, except for the arm that shooters actuate with their fingers. The Troy ABR weighs 0.3 oz while the Magpul BAD weighs 0.25 oz. Since having lighter accessories to rifles is better, Magpul BAD won this round.

Check out compact and lightweight stocks in this Magpul SL vs SLK comparison here.

Mounting - Troy or Magpul BAD?

The Troy ABR is more difficult to mount than the Magpul. Another downside of the ABR is that its screws do not include the suggested Loctite for mounting, unlike the Magpul BAD. But some customers complain about the Magpul being too loose because it only uses one screw, unlike the ABR that uses two 0.05” hexagonal set screws. With this, we decided to give the point to the ABR.

Installation

troy installation

Troy is quick to install, has high quality built, and no wiggle like the Magpul lever. It features an easy engagement to lock or unlock the bolt, and it’s effortless to feel to rechamber rounds. We usually try to use the standard manual of arms and hit the bolt release paddle on the AR, but we found out that it’s almost impossible to send the bolt home mag change when using a loop sling for stability without breaking its position. Troy ABR solved this issue for us, so Troy takes the point here.

Length of Magpul BAD & Troy Bolt Release

Magpul seems like a reliable and quality extended bolt release as it sticks out a little longer for my index finger to grab. Still, we find Troy a superior ambidextrous bolt release than the Magpul because it has less wiggle having a second screw that tightens it to the bolt release paddle, and the construction is sturdy and smooth. With this, Troy ABR earned another point.

Magpul Bad Lever Pros & Cons

PROS

CONS

Troy ABR Pros & Cons

PROS

CONS

Troy or Magpul BAD Lever? We Recommend...

In choosing between Magpul BAD Lever vs Troy, we recommend the Troy ABR because it features an easy engagement to lock or unlock the bolt and eliminates wasted motion. It also has better ambidextrous bolt release operation for quicker reloads and stronger hold as it uses two 0.05” hexagonal set screws.

Getting an upgrade? Check out out the best 6.5 Creedmoor AR muzzle brakes here.

Troy bold release product

Our #1 Recommendation

Troy

 

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